Diane Rogers

Graduating with a BA Hons in Textiles/Fashion ( Loughborough), Diane started as a fashion textile print designer in a London design studio, then worked as a freelance designer for many years selling worldwide to a wide variety of clients including fashion designers, converters and high street retailers. Based in Brighton, East Sussex, Diane now works mainly as a textile artist, producing hand painted and printed silk embroideries. Diane's work can be seen at the Joy Gallery, Chichester and the Saffron Gallery, Battle. A member of the Fiveways Artists Group www.fivewaysartists.com, she holds an Open House exhibition every year during the Brighton Festival in May.

Developments in the textile print design industry dictated a change in my work, from creating designs using gouache paints on paper to producing designs directly onto fabric. An increase in demand for more intricate designs developed and so my work then changed to involve the inclusion of embroidery and embellishment on my print designs. A quilting technique I was using on a particular group of designs inspired me with its possibilities and I began to experiment and developed this method as a way of producing raised fabric art pieces.

Photography is the first stage in the development of my work. My captured images are sometimes manipulated using Photoshop, then either hand painted with dyes or printed directly onto silk. The next process is to embroider and embellish by hand and free machine stitching to create texture and raised areas in relief. This gives a compelling, irresistible tactile quality to each piece. I particularly like the smooth lustrous qualities of silk and enjoy the discord between the properties of silk as a medium and my subject matter.

work by Diane Rogers
work by Diane Rogers
work by Diane Rogers
work by Diane Rogers
work by Diane Rogers
work by Diane Rogers

Inspiration for my work comes from nature and the environment. My main themes are carpets of rich colourful leaves, and the gnarled, grainy texture of tree bark, also the pebbles of Brighton beach and the rock pools further up the coast.

I am currently working on a series that combines two themes, I am using close up images of the rough, splintered and weathered wood found at the edges of walkways and the groynes on the Brighton seafront in contrast with the smooth hardness of colourful pebbles, which spill over the edges and become trapped in crevices.

www.dianerogers.co.uk